How healthcare used to be and how it will be

Predictive Healthcare is empowered by big data and machine learning. This is changing the way healthcare goods and services are being delivered to the population.

Sensors on wearables will be placed at any touchpoint where consumers interface with the health system. E.g. data from wearables can teach an AI to spot signs of diabetes.

How it used to be: Reactive Healthcare

/ Seek health services when feeling ill
/ Consumer sorts through different care options
/ Data is then captured to confirm the diagnosis

How it will be: Proactive and Predictive Healthcare

/ HealthData is captured via medical-grade wearables
/ Care option reaches out if there is an anomaly  
/ Provider already has the historical dataset of relevant biomarkers and genetic predisposition

Predictive Healthcare

What proactive Healthcare means, why it matters and how you can identify the business opportunity.

Voice skills are key to predictive healthcare

How two major health systems are using Alexa in healthcare today as well as their predictions for the future of voice assistants.

Maryam Gholami is the vice president of product at Providence St. Joseph Health, a hospital system right in Amazon’s backyard. Her team created an Alexa skill that lets patients book appointments at nearby clinics. It’s an early effort in what Gholami sees as a long-term need for the hospital.

“We see voice having massive impacts on healthcare in the future, both for consumers and caregivers,” she said. “Consumers are buying all these voice devices, whether it’s Alexa or a Google device.

So it’s important for us to start early, learn about the consumer’s behavior, and perfect that experience. It doesn’t happen overnight.”

  1. Understand the Eco-System
  2. Your Go-to-market Strategy
  3. Think ahead — way ahead

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Create a kind of statement of the future in terms of what you’d like to achieve. Divide what lies ahead into long-, medium-, and short-term goals, and budget your time by drawing up a road map to provide a visual reminder that will keep you on course and chart your success.

  • Start with an annual plan that accounts for long-range projects and establishes specific dates for completion.
  • Mark them all on your calendar, then revisit them each month to see what you want to accomplish, monitor your progress, and determine the next steps for getting things done.
  • Update your calendar from there. At the start of each week, build out your plan for the next seven days. List out all that you want to accomplish, referring back to your annual and monthly goals. Break these weekly goals into daily objectives to compile a “to-do” list for the week.
  • Each day, refer back to your weekly goals and build out your day by starting with high-priority tasks and moving on from there.

Source: CEOWorld – Written by The New York Times bestselling author and trends strategist Stefan Swanepoel.