Germany – Reasons for Doing Business

Germany is an open market and warmly welcomes foreign investors. That is demonstrated by the 22,000 foreign enterprises that have established businesses in Germany and now employ more than 2.7 million people. The German market is open to entrepreneurial investment in practically all areas.

More than 7 million foreigners live in Germany. Several metropolitan regions have prominent foreign communities with their own schools, churches, shops, and restaurants. 70%+ of German blue- and white-collar workers can speak English

Statistically, Germany has 277 international patents per one million inhabitants – more than anywhere else in the world. The close cooperation between industry and world-famous research institutions like the Max Planck and Fraunhofer Institutes swiftly transforms new ideas into products for the world market.

Germany has a closely-knit network of roads, railways, and international airports. That guarantees swift connections. The airport in Frankfurt is an international hub. The Port of Hamburg is one of the largest container transshipment centers in Europe.

Germany is a modern constitutional state with transparent and reasonable laws. The advantages are internationally recognized. The German legal system has served as a model for legal systems in many other countries. International studies demonstrate that German legal security is highly regarded by investors. Among all countries, Germany ranks fourth in terms of legal security.

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Geography

The German population is currently estimated at 82m. A full census has not been taken since 1987 (1981 in the eastern part of the country), and population trends since have been based on estimates supported by a continual micro-census. The next full census is planned for 2011 as part of an EU-wide project. In contrast to other western European countries, the population has risen over the past decade due to immigration, which up to now has generally more than compensated for the excess of deaths over live births. However, this trend has now ceased and the general assumption is that of a long-term movement towards a reduced and aging population: official estimates suggest that the population will fall to between 65 and 70 million by 2060 – depending on immigration levels.

Germany is more densely populated than either of her two largest neighbors, France and Poland. The population density is greatest in the traditional industrial areas of the Ruhr and parts of the Saar, the commercial centers of Cologne/DΓΌsseldorf, the Rhine-Main area of Frankfurt / Wiesbaden, Berlin, and on a smaller scale in and around the other larger cities. Few areas can be described as under-populated. There Is no significant tendency on the part of the population to emigrate, although all residents are free to do so and to take all their assets with them.

The German population is currently estimated at 82m. A full census has not been taken since 1987 (1981 in the eastern part of the country), and population trends since have been based on estimates supported by a continual micro-census. The next full census is planned for 2011 as part of an EU-wide project. In contrast to other western European countries, the population has risen over the past decade due to immigration, which up to now has generally more than compensated for the excess of deaths over live births.

However, this trend has now ceased and the general assumption is that of a long-term movement towards a reduced and aging population: official estimates suggest that the population will fall to between 65 and 70 million by 2060 – depending on immigration levels. Germany is more densely populated than either of her two largest neighbors, France and Poland. The population density is greatest in the traditional industrial areas of the Ruhr and parts of the Saar, the commercial centers of Cologne/DΓΌsseldorf, the Rhine-Main area of Frankfurt / Wiesbaden, Berlin, and on a smaller scale in and around the other larger cities. Few areas can be described as under-populated. There Is no significant tendency on the part of the population to emigrate, although all residents are free to do so and to take all their assets with them.